Middle European Scientific Bulletin

Volume 30, November 2022, Pages 172-179

Full Lenght Article
Impact of Malaria Parasitemia on Some Liver Enzymes among Adults Patients Attending University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State-Nigeria

Under a Creative Commons license
Open Access

Abstract

Nearly half of the world's population is susceptible to malaria, a potentially fatal disease. When the parasite infection is left untreated or treated incorrectly, it can lead to catastrophic side effects such as chronic renal disease, liver illness, and even death. The goal of this study was to examine the blood and liver enzymes of UMTH, Maiduguri's malaria patients. The ALP, AST, and ALT of the malaria parasite were measured using conventional techniques. In this study, 125 malaria patients at the UMTH were divided into groups according to their sex, age, gender, and malaria density. Their ALP, AST, and ALT blood liver enzyme levels were examined and compared to those of 125 control patients. The research found that the majority of malaria patients Thirty-eight (30.4%) of the malaria patients, or (58.4 percent) of the total population, were males and were between the ages of 25 and 31. They predominantly have low malaria densities (+). The mean ALP, AST, and ALT values for malaria patients were 5.801, 12.760, and 20.470, respectively. This difference was extremely significant (P 0.05). Our research revealed 2.995, 2.056, and 3.594 as very significant differences in liver enzymes. The average levels of ALP, AST, and ALT in malaria patients with (+) were 7.178, 1.854, and 7.345, respectively. indicated a significant statistical difference when compared to patients with malaria who had (++) (p 0.05/0.01). In comparison to age groups 18-24 years, 25-31 years, 32-38 years, and 39-45 years, the value of liver enzymes in malaria patients showed no significant changes at 0.621U/L, 0.120U/L, and 0.496U/L, respectively. However, as previously mentioned writers have noted, that more work must be done to implement control strategies and eradicate malaria infection in this area.

Abstract

Nearly half of the world's population is susceptible to malaria, a potentially fatal disease. When the parasite infection is left untreated or treated incorrectly, it can lead to catastrophic side effects such as chronic renal disease, liver illness, and even death. The goal of this study was to examine the blood and liver enzymes of UMTH, Maiduguri's malaria patients. The ALP, AST, and ALT of the malaria parasite were measured using conventional techniques. In this study, 125 malaria patients at the UMTH were divided into groups according to their sex, age, gender, and malaria density. Their ALP, AST, and ALT blood liver enzyme levels were examined and compared to those of 125 control patients. The research found that the majority of malaria patients Thirty-eight (30.4%) of the malaria patients, or (58.4 percent) of the total population, were males and were between the ages of 25 and 31. They predominantly have low malaria densities (+). The mean ALP, AST, and ALT values for malaria patients were 5.801, 12.760, and 20.470, respectively. This difference was extremely significant (P 0.05). Our research revealed 2.995, 2.056, and 3.594 as very significant differences in liver enzymes. The average levels of ALP, AST, and ALT in malaria patients with (+) were 7.178, 1.854, and 7.345, respectively. indicated a significant statistical difference when compared to patients with malaria who had (++) (p 0.05/0.01). In comparison to age groups 18-24 years, 25-31 years, 32-38 years, and 39-45 years, the value of liver enzymes in malaria patients showed no significant changes at 0.621U/L, 0.120U/L, and 0.496U/L, respectively. However, as previously mentioned writers have noted, that more work must be done to implement control strategies and eradicate malaria infection in this area.

Keywords

Parasitemia

Declarations

Conflict of Interest Statement

The author (s) declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

1. Ananad, A.C., Ramji, C., Narula, A.S., and Sinh, W. (1992). Malarial hepatitis: a heterogeneous syndrome. Natl Med J India. 5:59-62 (PubMed).
2. Calbreath, D.F (1992)., Philadelphia, W.B., Chawala, L.S., Sidhu, J., Sabharwal, B.D (1989). Jaundice in P. falciparum. J Assoc Physician India. 37:390-392
3. Devarbhavi, H., Alvare, J.F., and Kumar S.K. (2005).Severe falciparum malaria simulating fulminant hepatic failure. MayoClim Proc.; 80:355-358.
4. Ghoda, M. K (2002). Falciparum hepatopathy. A reversible and transient involment of liver in falciparum malaria. TropGastroenterol. 23:70-71
5. Jarike, A. E., Emuveyon, E. E., Idogun, S. F. (2002). Pitfalls in the interpretations of liver parenchymalandmembraneous enzyme results in preclinical P. falciparum and malaria in the Nigerian environment. Nig. Clin. Med. 10:21-27.
6. Kochar, D.K., Agarwal, P., Kochar, S., K. (2003). Hepatocyte dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. QJM 96:505-512.
7. Kochar, D.K., Singh, P., Agarwa, P., Kochar, S.K., Pokharna, R. and Sareen, P.K. (2003). Malarial hepatitis. J Assoc. Physicians India. 51:1069-1072 (PubMed).
8. Kotepui, M., (2015). Effect of malaria parasite density on Blood cell Parameters 141.
9. Mishra, S.K., Mohanty, S. (2003). Problems in the management of severe malaria.The Internet J. Trop Med. 1(1), 1-10.
10. National Population Commission (2007). National Population Commission and Housing Census. Extraordinary Gazette 2007:B.197.
11. Ogbadoyi, E. O., Tsado, R. D. (2009). Renal and Hepatic Dysfunction in Malaria Patients in Minna, North Central Nigeria. Online J. Health Allied. Sci. 8:2-6.
12. Onyesom, I., Onyemakonor, N. (2011). Levels of parasitemia and changes in some liver enzymes among malarial infected patients in Edo-Delta region of Nigeria.Curr. Res. J. Biol. Sci. 3: 78-81.
13. Onyesom, I. (2012). Activities of some liver enzymes in serum of P. falciparum malarial infected humans receiving artemisinin and nonartemisinin-based combination therapy. Ann. Biol. Res. 3:3097-3100.
14. Pratt, D.S., Kapla, M.M (2000). Evaluation of abnormal liver enzyme results in an asymptomatic patient.NEJM.1266-1271.
15. Reitman, S and Frankel, S. (1957). Determination of Plasma Amino Transferase activities. Amer. J. Clin. Path.28:56.
16. Rosenthal, P., Haight, M (1989). Aminotransferase is a prognostic index in infants with liver disease.Clin Chim; 36:346-348
17. Schiff, E.R., Medina, M., Kahn, R.S.New perspectives in the diagnosis of Hepatitis. C Seminal liver Dis 1999;19:3-15
18. Sharma, S.K., Sharma, B.H.K., Shakya, K., Khanal, B., Khaniya, S., Shrestha, (2004). Acute renal failure and hepatic dysfunction in malaria. J. Nepal Med. Assoc. 43:7-9.
19. Trampuz, A., Jereb, M., Muzlovic, I. and Prabhu, R. (2003). Clinical review: severe malaria. Crit Care 7 (4):315-23.
20. World Health Organization. Communicable diseases. WHO Malaria facts and figures. World Health Organization, Europe. 2011.
21. World Health Organisation, (2005). Implementation of the Global malaria control strategy. Report of a WHO Study Group. General: ISBN 9241208392
22. World Health Organization (2012) Communicable diseases. WHO Malaria facts and figures. World Health Organization, Europe.

Bibliographic Information

Verify authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article as:

Ishaku, I. U., Inuwa, A., Adam, Y., Yahaya, I., & Asiya, M. (2022). Impact of Malaria Parasitemia on Some Liver Enzymes among Adults Patients Attending University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State-Nigeria. Middle European Scientific Bulletin, 30, 172-179. Retrieved from https://cejsr.academicjournal.io/index.php/journal/article/view/1607
  • Submitted
    25 November 2022
  • Revised
    25 November 2022
  • Published
    25 November 2022