Middle European Scientific Bulletin

Volume 30, November 2022, Pages 153-171

Full Lenght Article
Effects of Malaria Parasitaemia on Electrolytes (NA, K, CL, HCO3) and Some Liver Enzymes (AST and ALT) in Patient Attending University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital

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Abstract

Malaria is a life threatening disease, with nearly half of the world’s population being vulnerable to the infection. The parasitic infection, when untreated or improperly treated, is characterized by fatal complications such as chronic kidney disease, liver disease and death. This study was designed to analyze blood electrolytes and liver enzymes of malaria patients attending UMTH, Maiduguri. Standard methods were used to determine malaria density, Na+, K+, Cl- and HCO3-) ALP, AST and ALT. Majority of the malaria patients (39.4%) are within the age group of 25 to 31 years. One hundred and sixty one (89.4%) out of 180 malaria patients have malaria density of (+) while 19 (10.6%) have malaria density of (++).The mean value of chloride of 102.29 ± 6.89 mmol/L in malaria patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects of 103.07 ± 5.81 (p˂ 0.05). The mean value of ALT of 10.35 ± 4.33 U/L in male malaria patients was significantly higher than that of female malaria patients of 8.87 ± 4.13 (p˂ 0.05). The mean values of Na+, K+, Cl-, HCO3-, ALP, AST and ALT in malaria patients with (+) showed no statistical difference compared to malaria patients with (++) (p˃ 0.05). The mean values of HCO3- of 20.65 ± 1.39 mmol/L, 20.72 ± 1.50 mmol/L, 21.20 ± 1.31 mmol/L, 21.23 ± 1.34 mmol/L and 22.14 ± 1.07 mmol/L for 18-24 years, 25-31 years, 32-38 years, 39-45 years and 46-52 years, respectively showed statistically significant difference. It is concluded that majority of malaria patients who are males and adults, seek medical attention at early stage of malaria infection and at the point of enrolment where the malaria infection have little or no effects on electrolytes and liver enzymes. This is an indication of effectiveness of awareness and control measures against malaria infection. However, as emphasized by previous authors, efforts are still needed toward control measures and eradication of malaria infection in this region.

Abstract

Malaria is a life threatening disease, with nearly half of the world’s population being vulnerable to the infection. The parasitic infection, when untreated or improperly treated, is characterized by fatal complications such as chronic kidney disease, liver disease and death. This study was designed to analyze blood electrolytes and liver enzymes of malaria patients attending UMTH, Maiduguri. Standard methods were used to determine malaria density, Na+, K+, Cl- and HCO3-) ALP, AST and ALT. Majority of the malaria patients (39.4%) are within the age group of 25 to 31 years. One hundred and sixty one (89.4%) out of 180 malaria patients have malaria density of (+) while 19 (10.6%) have malaria density of (++).The mean value of chloride of 102.29 ± 6.89 mmol/L in malaria patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects of 103.07 ± 5.81 (p˂ 0.05). The mean value of ALT of 10.35 ± 4.33 U/L in male malaria patients was significantly higher than that of female malaria patients of 8.87 ± 4.13 (p˂ 0.05). The mean values of Na+, K+, Cl-, HCO3-, ALP, AST and ALT in malaria patients with (+) showed no statistical difference compared to malaria patients with (++) (p˃ 0.05). The mean values of HCO3- of 20.65 ± 1.39 mmol/L, 20.72 ± 1.50 mmol/L, 21.20 ± 1.31 mmol/L, 21.23 ± 1.34 mmol/L and 22.14 ± 1.07 mmol/L for 18-24 years, 25-31 years, 32-38 years, 39-45 years and 46-52 years, respectively showed statistically significant difference. It is concluded that majority of malaria patients who are males and adults, seek medical attention at early stage of malaria infection and at the point of enrolment where the malaria infection have little or no effects on electrolytes and liver enzymes. This is an indication of effectiveness of awareness and control measures against malaria infection. However, as emphasized by previous authors, efforts are still needed toward control measures and eradication of malaria infection in this region.

Keywords

Electrolytes

Declarations

Conflict of Interest Statement

The author (s) declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

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Ishaku, I. U., & Inuwa, D. A. (2022). Effects of Malaria Parasitaemia on Electrolytes (NA, K, CL, HCO3) and Some Liver Enzymes (AST and ALT) in Patient Attending University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital. Middle European Scientific Bulletin, 30, 153-171. Retrieved from https://cejsr.academicjournal.io/index.php/journal/article/view/1606
  • Submitted
    25 November 2022
  • Revised
    25 November 2022
  • Published
    25 November 2022